Publication: we all benefit

It is always interesting to see a sponsor’s reaction when we describe the Dutch directive related to publication of trial results. It either ranges from nonchalant shrugging of shoulders to raised eyebrows to utter panic. In the Netherlands, the Competent Authority has issued a directive that the clinical trial agreement cannot include unreasonable restrictions on publication of trial results. Many small biotech companies are very open to publishing their trial’s results. On the other hand, there is an unfounded fear amongst some pharma (or at least their lawyers) that their confidential, proprietary data will be published without their consent. Of course, there are safe-guards in the directive preventing this kind of recklessness. And unsurprisingly, in a collaborative setting this is never the case.

The merits of publishing (and the perils and biases of not publishing) are well known and are not simply restricted to increasing academic knowledge but indirectly benefits subjects, patients and the community as well. Nonetheless, for a niche CRO such as CHDR, publication of peer-reviewed articles is one of the ways we establish our expertise in an particular field. And many of our sponsors initially become familiar with us by finding research we have (co-)authored in the literature or as poster presentations at conferences.

Also CHDR is somewhat unique in that the clinical scientists and research physicians who work as project managers are also PhD candidates. With the goal that within 3 to 5 years they have completed their degree, this also includes publishing 4 to 7 articles. This construct of having PhD candidates working in early phase clinical research unit has the benefit of educating them in the fundamentals of clinical pharmacology and at the same time they gain experience in how pharma and academia works (or doesn’t). This also enables us to address the knowledge gap between academia and industry.

Besides, all of our senior clinical scientists are encouraged to participate in peer-review of manuscripts in their respective fields. With some of our research directors and CEO, being Executive Editors and Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, respectively. This allows our management team to keep up to date with the latest, cutting edge, clinical pharmacology research.

It is motivating to see that even at a regulatory level there is a push for greater transparency. Since the beginning of 2015, the EMA will  proactively publish the clinical reports submitted as part of marketing-authorization applications for human medicines, no doubt including many early phase studies. Similarly, it will be interesting to see how the new European Clinical Trial Regulation will be implemented. The regulation includes the requirement for Phase 1 trials to be registered and summary reports and lay summaries published within one year from the end of the clinical trial. No doubt we will see in due course if this forces the disclosure of commercially confidential information or sets out to do what it intended to do and provide information on innovative (and not-so-innovative) clinical research.

Justin Hay, Senior Clinical Scientist

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